Tuesday, 16 July 2013

Researchers isolate stem cells linked to Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Researchers just announced that they have taken the next step towards isolating the origin of cells linked to a progressive disorder known as Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, leading to a greater understanding of what goes into the development of our blood circulating systems.

University of Lincoln Life Sciences academic Dr Rajiv Machado, with colleagues from the University of Cambridge, King's College London and Papworth Hospital, has revealed the recent findings in a research letter toThe American Journal of Respiratoryand Critical Care Medicine.

Dr Machado's main research area is in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) which is a progressive disorder characterised by abnormally high blood pressure (hypertension) in the pulmonary artery, the blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the lungs. Symptoms include shortness of breath, dizziness, swelling (oedema) of the ankles or legs, chest pain and a racing pulse.

In this latest study, researchers investigated genetically identical twins, both of which had the genetic marker responsible for PAH.

However, only one had the disorder which resulted in both a heart and lung transplant. From this starting block, the team were able to investigate the origin of blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOEC), which are stem cells and good candidates for vascular (re-) generating cell therapy. However, uncertainty remains as to the specific origin of these cells.

The researchers study of the twins and the mutation they both harboured enabled them to identify a marker to show that those stem cells, the BOECs, were very unlikely to have come from the heart or lungs.

"When the circulating BOECs were cultured from the new heart and lungs they still showed the mutation. Hence, they must have been produced in a different organ/s. The importance of this is that scientists are keen to know the origin of these cells both as a proxy for basic science and to provide an understanding of what goes into the development of our blood circulating systems. If we can in one fell swoop remove two organs as being contributory then we are another step closer to knowing where these cells come from." said Dr Machado.

Reference
Sertório JT, Neto-Neves EM, Dias-Junior CA, Sousa-Santos O, Kiss T, Mühl D, & Tanus-Santos JE (2013). Elevated plasma hemoglobin levels increase nitric oxide consumption in experimental and clinical acute pulmonary thromboembolism*. Critical care medicine, 41 (7) PMID: 23478656 

1 comment:

  1. Hey thanks for share the blog. You share some good information here on Pulmonary.
    Pulmonary embolism is a blockage in an artery in the lung. It is usually due to a blood clot that has traveled to the lung from another part of the body, usually the leg.
    Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure. When the heart is not able to pump blood to the body efficiently, it can back up into the veins that take blood through the lungs to the left side of the heart.As the pressure in these blood vessels increases, fluid is pushed into the air spaces (alveoli) in the lungs. This fluid reduces normal oxygen movement through the lungs. This and the increased pressure can lead to shortness of breath.


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